Acitvities

Kayaking

It’s an iconic image of outdoor exploration: a kayak glides across a glassy stretch of water, its bow knifing through the mist and its wake shimmering in reflected light. If that sort of thing calls to you, we’re here to help. With some thoughtful preparation, you can slip into the cockpit and put paddle to pond.

Most trips start off with a launch from a gradually sloping shoreline. Take care to avoid dragging the hull, especially on rocky, sandy or cement surfaces:

  • Get a friend to help you carry the boat to your put-in point. Set it down in shallow water, perpendicular to the shoreline. (If you’re launching into a river or have a very long kayak, then a parallel launch might work better.) For a perpendicular launch, the bow should face away from the shore and the stern should be close to the shore (but fully afloat).
  • Put one of your paddle blades under the deck line in front of the cockpit. (The shaft can stick out sideways like an outrigger.)
  • Stand over the kayak, straddling the cockpit.

Swimming

swimming, in recreation and sports, the propulsion of the body through water by combined arm and leg motions and the natural flotation of the body. Swimming as an exercise is popular as an all-around body developer and is particularly useful in therapy and as exercise for physically handicapped persons. It is also taught for lifesaving purposes. For activities that involve swimming, see also diving, lifesaving, surfing, synchronized swimming, underwater diving, and water polo.

Archaeological and other evidence shows swimming to have been practiced as early as 2500 BCE in Egypt and thereafter in Assyrian, Greek, and Roman civilizations. In Greece and Rome swimming was a part of martial training and was, with the alphabet, also part of elementary education for males. In the Orient swimming dates back at least to the 1st century BCE, there being some evidence of swimming races then in Japan.

Sunbathing

With so much talk about seeking shade and wearing SPF — even on cloudy days and in winter — it can be hard to believe that exposure to the sun, in small doses, can be beneficial.

Sunbathing, which is the act of sitting or lying in the sun, sometimes with the intent to tan, may have some health benefits if done properly.

There’s a major difference, to be sure, between going outside for 10 minutes without sunscreen and regularly spending time in a tanning bed.

The risks of too much sun exposure are well-documented. Spending time in the sun without SPF is one cause of melanoma, among other conditions.

However, high doses of vitamin D — when exposed to sunlight, our skin turns cholesterol to vitamin D — have been shown to help prevent certain common ailments and diseases.

Cycling

To be fit and healthy you need to be physically active. Regular physical activity can help protect you from serious diseases such as obesity, heart disease, cancer, mental illness, diabetes and arthritis. Riding your bicycle regularly is one of the best ways to reduce your risk of health problems associated with a sedentary lifestyle.

Cycling is a healthy, low-impact exercise that can be enjoyed by people of all ages, from young children to older adults. It is also fun, cheap and good for the environment.

Riding to work or the shops is one of the most time-efficient ways to combine regular exercise with your everyday routine. An estimated one billion people ride bicycles every day – for transport, recreation and sport.

Cave Exploring

Caving – also known as spelunking in the United States and Canada and potholing in the United Kingdom and Ireland – is the recreational pastime of exploring wild cave systems (as distinguished from show caves). In contrast, speleology is the scientific study of caves and the cave environment.

The challenges involved in caving vary according to the cave being visited; in addition to the total absence of light beyond the entrance, negotiating pitches, squeezes, and water hazards can be difficult. Cave diving is a distinct, and more hazardous, sub-speciality undertaken by a small minority of technically proficient cavers. In an area of overlap between recreational pursuit and scientific study, the most devoted and serious-minded cavers become accomplished at the surveying and mapping of caves and the formal publication of their efforts. These are usually published freely and publicly, especially in the UK and other European countries, although in the US, these are generally private.

Sometimes categorized as an “extreme sport”, it is not commonly considered as such by longtime enthusiasts, who may dislike the term for its connotation of disregard for safety.[